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The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media

Covering the Bronco Nation.

The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media

Covering the Bronco Nation.

The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media

Bronco Minute 4-19
Boys’ 4×4 Relay Advances to Regionals
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Bronco Minute 4-19
Boys’ 4×4 Relay Advances to Regionals
Bronco Minute 4-12
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We, God’s Children, Are Not For Sale

The+Sound+of+Freedom+aired+in+theaters+July+4%2C+2023%2C+and+grossed+about+%24190+million+after+about+three+months+on+the+screens.+Photo+by+Angel+Studios
The Sound of Freedom aired in theaters July 4, 2023, and grossed about $190 million after about three months on the screens. Photo by Angel Studios

The summer 2023 movie season proved to be a successful season, with the “Barbie,” “Oppenheimer” and “Sound of Freedom” trifecta grossing over $2.4 billion as of Sept. 2023. Though vastly different, each of them addressed a seemingly taboo subject in today’s culture whether it be gender imbalance, the use of atomic bombs, or the trafficking of children, the movies each broke social norms–and succeeded because of it.

“Sound of Freedom” tells a unique story, one it seems everyone knows about, but many refuse to acknowledge. Directed by Alejandro Gómez Monteverde and produced by Angel Studios the movie pushes the envelope of a PG-13 film, as it very clearly shows children taken in broad daylight, some right from the sides of their mothers. It doesn’t blur the tough parts, because, after all, it’s based on a true story. It sends a strong message to viewers: child trafficking is real, and it’s happening right in your neighborhood, your city, your state and your country. 

The movie starts and ends with the same clip, a young Hispanic girl playing a rhythmic melody in her bed. As the shot widens, the smile on her face, despite the rundown home she’s in, or the city with houses seemingly piled on top of each other, comforts the viewer. Whether you’re watching the clip in the beginning of the movie, wondering if it’ll tiptoe around the tough conversations, or the clip as it closes the movie, reeling from the two hours of intense heartache, the producers knew what they were doing. They evoked real and pure emotion from the viewers, which in today’s culture of lighthearted and muted movies, is rare. The movie centers around the motivation for ending child trafficking, because God’s children aren’t for sale. It’s woven throughout much of the movie, and a surprising phrase to see in a modern-day movie, but incredibly impactful and lasting. 

There’s so many things the movie did well, especially set design and authenticity. Though it certainly wasn’t a multi-billion dollar budget film, it never once felt cheap or unrealistic. The outfits always fit the occasion, and the setting never seemed implausible or fake. As a viewer, you felt like you we’re beside the group as they dug into this scheme, your heart racing, just as it would if it was a real scene.

Tim Ballard, played by Jim Caviezel, leads the movie, bringing viewers through the heart-wrenching story of child trafficking in South America. The movie is based on a true story. Photo by Angel Studios

Overall, the movie sets up and tells the story well, plopping the viewer in a tearjerking scene, and ends with a feel-good moment for the kids, but what it doesn’t do is give you a glimpse into the life of the man who put his life on hold to find and save the countless kids in child trafficking schemes. It ties a nice bow around the lives of the saved children, but leaves the viewer wondering how this hero returns to a normal life, and what happens with his own family after such a changing experience. 

Though it’s mostly out of theaters now, it’s available for free to stream through Angel Studios.

I can’t complain or critique a movie that allowed viewers a glimpse into the very scary and very real trade of children on the open market. The statistics it showed, the words it used, were each powerful, and specifically designed to teach the viewers in a unique way. It gave viewers a chance to experience real situations and allow it to make a real impact on the viewers. 

About the Contributor
Blake Hinerman
Blake Hinerman, Editor in Chief
Big fan of sour skittles, iced lattes, and Celsius. Probably living off of all of them at the moment.
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