Covering the Bronco Nation.

The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media

Covering the Bronco Nation.

The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media

Covering the Bronco Nation.

The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media

What are endorsements, and why are they important?

Freshman+students+work+on+an+assignment+in+AP+Human+Geography.+Students+can+earn+an+endorsement+in+one+of+five+areas%2C+which+prepare+students+for+life+after+high+school.+%5BFile+Photo%5D
Photo by Reese Mallett
Freshman students work on an assignment in AP Human Geography. Students can earn an endorsement in one of five areas, which prepare students for life after high school. [File Photo]

High school students often have questions about endorsements and what purpose they serve. The Texas Education Agency (TEA) determines an endorsement as a set of courses that allows a student in high school to explore areas of interest they might have. Mansfield ISD requires all eighth-grade students to take a semester-long Career Pathways course, in which they are introduced to and pick their future high school endorsement. At the end of the course, they meet with lead counselor Dana Vorsino and other counselors to secure their endorsement and establish their schedules. 

“An endorsement is kind of like picking a college major in high school,” Ms. Vorsino said. “The purpose behind them is if you’re wanting to be an engineer, you can take those classes in high school and kind of decide is this the right path and if [you] want to continue this in college.”

The five endorsement areas are Arts and Humanities, Business and Industry, Multidisciplinary, Public Service and STEM. These five endorsement areas exist to prepare students for their future careers. Freshman Jack (Cameron) Kennedy plans to take advantage of the multiple endorsement options offered in Mansfield ISD. 

“I want to be a music teacher. That’s primarily why I’m doing all choir throughout high school, but I’m also doing culinary and law this year just to see if that’s something I’d be interested in,” Kennedy said. “The choir will help get me set up for having the credibility to be a [music] teacher.“

An endorsement is kind of like picking a college major in high school. The purpose behind them is if you’re wanting to be an engineer, you can take those classes in high school and kind of decide is this the right path and if [you] want to continue this in college.

— Ms. Dana Vorsino, Lead Counselor

The state of Texas has specific requirements pertaining to endorsements and how they are used for graduation. Additionally, students have the option to pursue more than one of the five endorsement areas to allow them to be able to explore all of their options. 

“You can graduate with more than one endorsement but you have to graduate with at least one,” Ms. Vorsino said.

Although required, students have options if they do not want to pursue a specific endorsement or participate in career-based courses. 

“Students that do not graduate with an endorsement [are] dropped down to what’s called the foundation plan. You can still graduate with your high school diploma, but you’re more limited on your options after high school,” Ms. Vorsino said. 

While students figure out what to do in high school, the process can be long and stressful. Having numerous endorsement options helps some who explore courses they end up not enjoying. 

Kennedy plans to take law classes his freshman year which contribute to a public service endorsement and continue the classes if they interest him, but get a multidisciplinary endorsement for graduation. 

“If I did continue with law, then I take three law classes, but the multidisciplinary endorsement is built into your [core] classes as well,” Kennedy said. 

Students who have questions about their endorsements can ask their counselors about what they can do to work toward an endorsement. Counselors also can be helpful in helping students explore various course options and decide what they might want to do after high school. 

Legacy High School Counselor Assignments: 

Dana Vorsino: Last Names A-B
Haley White: Last Names C-Gn
Angela Julius: Last Names Go-Lh
Lisa Fields: Li-O
Chatrina Chapman-Forte: P-Sq
Jennifer Thomas: Sr-Z
Amy Andra: Student support counselor

Leave a Comment
About the Contributors
Jackson Gourley
Jackson Gourley, Staff Writer
Hi, I’m Jackson. I’m a senior but this is my first year in journalism and I love to travel and discover new music.
Reese Mallett
Reese Mallett, Assistant Photo Editor
Hello!!! I am one of the Photo editors for this year. I love photography and working with Legacy Student Media. Waffles are better than pancakes, cats are better than dogs, and Jesus is life.
Donate to The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media
$0
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Your donation will support the student journalists of Mansfield Legacy High School. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs and travel to media workshops.

Donate to The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media
$0
$5000
Contributed
Our Goal

Comments (0)

All The Rider Online | Legacy HS Student Media Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *