Theater Performs ‘Epic Proportions’ for One Act Play Competition

At+the+One+Act+Play+competition+on+March+21%2C+junior+Cole+Collier+talks+to+senior+Kyle+Horne.+Legacy+advanced+in+the+OAP+competition.

Photo by Sandra Estes

At the One Act Play competition on March 21, junior Cole Collier talks to senior Kyle Horne. Legacy advanced in the OAP competition.

The theater consists of wild costumes, memorizing plays, and a variety of different shows, but how much work is really going on?

“We came back for One-Act Play on Jan. 24 as we just finished Shrek [several days before.] We had no breaks, and we are working from Monday to Thursday,” Ms. Sarah Fortune, theater teacher, said.

Theater attends a series of clinics which allows for the crew of actors to test run the show they’ll perform in UIL theater.

“A judge watches our performance and gives us feedback on what we need to improve on, ” Fortune said. “However, it’s really a matter of picking and choosing what works best for our crew.”

Theater competed at the UIL competition in Burleson on Feb. 11. UIL allows for you to compete at the highest level starting at district and ending at state.

“This year, we are performing the play Epic Proportions, which is more of a funnier play based in the 1940s,” Fortune said. “We had serious plays in the past and wanted to switch it up.”

In theater, memorization is crucial to your performance. However, this is no easy task for anyone.

“We normally ask for them to be off-book on the first day of district,” Fortune said. “This is challenging but now we have to work on the physical side and the jokes which may not feel comfortable to them but we have to make it comfortable.”

As theater is all about collaboration and group effort, the kids get to grow and interact with each other well.

“I feel this group, with new members such as Cole Collier who plays football, and Luke Goines who runs track, has stood out,” Fortune said. “We want our students to be well-rounded and work with everything. More than anything, the coaches and faculty are super willing to let these kids explore what they want to get into.”